Sunday, September 21, 2014

Paint Chip Poetry

Silkworm and I picked up these paint chips with another idea in mind, which we'll revisit in the near future, but upon reading the names of the colors and finding connections, we were inspired to do something different with them.

We wrote poetry--or maybe prose. We tried not to think too much and let the connections between the colors form themselves, and then we'd just build off of the idea. Some of them proved harder to work with than others, because the names of colors didn't sound good together, but the key is just to fit them into a poem. Don't worry about if the colors sound silly or like something you'd never write. Just let them flow. Play with longer and shorter paint chips with more or less colors. Work off of only one color or mix ten different paint chips. Let the changing of the colors create and guide the mood of the story.

(The blue one is our favorite from our bunch. We even folded it up to put in our memory shoebox.)

Paint chip poetry is a wonderful way to spark creativity. Each one can end up sounding other-worldly and naturally magical. Writers suffering from dreaded cases of Writer's Block would probably find them as useful prompts for creating settings, characters, or plots.

Let us know if you write any paint chip poems, and we'd love it if you'd share them with us! And you can read all four of ours below.







Yellow: A meadow of Tropical Cassia and Wild Chanterelle grew under our feet. There were two cottages before us, one painted Eastern Colonial Yellow and the other Vintage Scotch Yellow. A Summer Sunflower grew through the roof of the second house, tall and Rich Curry Gold. The world was the epitome of Warm Autumn Gold.

Green: The air smelled like Wild Lemon Basil. She'd just finished cleaning. Out the window was a field of Golden Wheat Grass and we could hear the Rushing Tiger River behind the house. The witch came in, her face Somber Bitter Green. She carried a basket of lettuce looking much more like Swiss cheese, from which a Garden Katydid proudly hopped off. Salad was cancelled and instead we ate Olive Toast at the Sorrento Estate.

Blue: An enormous Cloud Formation the shape of a fortress graced the sky that radiated the Essence of Blue. We were on an island in the middle of the ocean exploring a Bluebell Garden. We'd gotten Lost at Sea searching for the Cherished Blue Diamond and suddenly we fell into space. We got further lost in the Limitless Cosmos Blue. The inside of Neptune is Deep Heliotrope and so is the color of my veins.

White: The air was Quite White if air can be such a thing. His face, on the other hand, was turning Mountain Ash Gray. We handed him a Pocket Full of White and he mixed it with Cut Crystal. Someone played a Silver Celesta in the corner of the room with playful fingers. Japanese Windflower started to grow through the walls. In return for our help, he gave us the Jeweler's Lavender Gem.

16 comments:

  1. I must say this is one of my favourite things that you've done! All your poems are wonderful and they'd be great to use for bookmarks!

    x Erin

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    1. Thank you! Ah, bookmarks--that's a marvelous idea! I think I need to get some more to write better things on and send them as snail mail gifts. :)

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  2. This is such a great idea, and so beautiful! Your blog is wonderfully inspiring and you definately got your self a new follower!

    Hopeless✈Wanderer

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    1. Thank you oh so much! (Your blog is quite lovely yourself and you can bet you've got a new follower in return!)

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  3. Carly! This is so amazing and creative! I think it would be a wonderful workshop for youth who are getting into creative writing or just as an ice breaker :)

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    1. Thank you so much! (You know, I was actually quite surprised when I Googled "paint chip poetry" and didn't get anything like this!) Oh, you're making me think it would be so cool if a few teachers catch sight of this and use it as a classroom project.

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  4. These are so nice! Really lovely post, as usual. :)

    catscraftsncritters.blogspot.ca

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  5. What an special idea Carly! Love how you use the colors names connected between the words. Perfect project for a writing class!

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  6. Wow, what a phenomenal idea! Your poems are so beautiful, I especially love the blue one. I'm definitely keeping this in mind for future projects! :) :) :)

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    1. Thank you so much! The blue one is my favorite, too, and it was actually the first one we wrote!

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  7. Oh what a fun idea, the paint names are poetry within themselves, and you made it awesome! Love it!

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    1. Shucks, thank you! The paint chip names are quite poetic for sure. Wouldn't it be cool to tell everyone who walks into your living room that it's painted "Pocket Full of White?"

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  8. Words cannot describe how much I love this.

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    1. I don't know, those eight words seem to be communicating enough to make me wanna hug you!

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  9. This is amazing, Carly! I used to write random poems on paint chip strips on my typewriter, but I NEVER thought about incorporating the actual names of the colors in them! (Also, it would be SO cool to have the job where you get to name colors.)

    Uncustomary Art.

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    1. Thank you! Oh man I wish I had a typewriter for cool stuff like that. And 'tis true, whoever names paint colors and nail polish colors and all those other quirky-named things is a lucky duck.

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Silkworm and I love hearing what other people think. In fact, it's probably our favorite thing, so don't be shy to leave us a note or ask a question!

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